Growing Financial Services Fellowship Builds Regional Talent Pipeline.

There were days as graduate students at SDSU when Ryan Burton and Valerie Bares were learning something in class and applying it that same day in the workplace.

They were two of more than a dozen participants in a unique fellowship program offered by Capital Services, a leading payment portfolio management and service company that originates, services, and manages card assets on behalf of client banks.

Burton and Bares, who earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in the SDSU department of mathematics and statistics, were selected as Capital Services fellows and have gone on to build in-demand careers with what they learned.


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From sixth graders to chemical engineers: Workforce development STEM program connects kids with careers

Call this a formula for workforce development success: The Sioux Falls Development Foundation and POET teamed up recently to provide a memorable lesson for Brandon Valley sixth graders.

The program included a lesson on POET itself, the careers available there and a hands-on activity that introduced concepts of chemical engineering.

“It’s an excellent way to get kids exposed to careers and opportunities out there and tie that to what they’re doing in school,” said Bob Mundt, Development Foundation president and CEO, who rolled up his sleeves and helped students through the hands-on activity.

“I was amazed how the kids took to it and took to their roles and responsibilities,” he said. “This is early-stage workforce development – it’s not for next week – but five to 10 years from now, we’re still going to need them entering fields like this.”


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USD meets growing demand for health care workers with hands-on, high-tech programs

Whether they’re using dental instruments or 3D printers, doing patient simulations or digital image analysis, students at the University of South Dakota likely have health care-related jobs waiting for them when they graduate.

“We have a really powerful system of health care in South Dakota, without question, and they’re also really good jobs,” USD president Sheila Gestring said. “They’re high-demand jobs, and the employment growth projections going forward are also significant.”

The appeal and availability of those jobs is driving student interest in both USD’s School of Health Sciences and its emerging biomedical engineering program within the College of Arts & Sciences.

In many cases, students graduating with degrees from these programs will find their occupations projected to experience double-digit percentage increases.


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New additions to ag education prepare students for jobs of the future

One look at some of the newest additions to South Dakota State University make it clear: Ag-related education is changing.
 
“We’re doing things that are really relevant to all the real, major grand challenges that face society today,” said John Killefer, the South Dakota Corn-Endowed Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.
 
There are 2,000 undergraduates and 300 graduate students in the college, spread across 23 majors. Many of them are working and learning in facilities unlike any other in the country – preparing them for a huge range of in-demand jobs.
 
“There’s probably never been a more exciting time to be in this type of college for a student in the future than it is today,” Killefer said.


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Students learn STEM, soft skills through workforce development partnership

The cafeteria at Dell Rapids Middle School cooked up something different recently when fifth graders, business representatives and educators put on a one-of-a-kind STEM lesson.

The effort, led and coordinated by the Sioux Falls Development Foundation, brought together partners Gage Brothers Concrete Products and Journey Group for a lesson that include a hands-on look at how cement becomes concrete.

Along the way, students learned about science and math-related concepts and the careers they might pursue in related industries.

Here’s a look at how the activity came together.


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‘The cyber state’ takes shape with first-of-its-kind research center

Think of the newly opened Madison Cyber Labs at Dakota State University as a big magnet.

“It’s going to attract people to come to work, new faculty who will be able to conduct research with federal agencies they can’t do on other campuses,” DSU president José-Marie Griffiths said. “And we think it will attract partnerships. We know it’s already attracting partnerships.”

The 38,000-square-foot building that opened in recent weeks already is fulfilling much of its promise.

As students move in, collaboration already is starting, those using the building said.

That was the idea when Griffiths proposed the concept to her campus and to the South Dakota Board of Regents just a few short years ago.

“We couldn’t have one lab per faculty member pursuing their individual research agendas. They had to be broader and involve others across campus and potentially involve external partners,” she said.

“The intent is not just research for the sake of research. It’s researching real problems, developing real solutions, but at the same time creating jobs for people who engage in that R&D and spin off companies that take that R&D and put it out into the real world.”


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